Bleats

The Badass Ladies Crafting Your New Fave Beer Aren't Here For Gender Tropes

It's no longer just the working man's beverage of choice.

Ahhh, beer. It’s cold, refreshing and God, does it taste good. But since the dawn of time, it’s been considered the ‘working mans’ beverage of choice and has therefore left the ladies out in the cold – until now.

2020 is the year beer becomes the working woman’s drink, and the female brewers at Young Henrys are at the forefront of that.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, this Sunday the 8th of March, Young Henrys is releasing ‘FREE THE NEIPA,’ a hazy, complex, citrusy New England IPA exclusively brewed, bottled and brought to us exclusively by ladies as part of the brewery’s B-Side series. Oh, and 10% of the proceeds of the beer go to Too Good Co, a social enterprise that supports and employs vulnerable women. 

Carla Daunton, one of the Young Henrys brewers behind FREE THE NEIPA appeared on the latest episode of It’s Been A Big Day For…to twist the lid on all this lady beer business and it’s safe to say, our thirsts were well and truly quenched.

Listen to the latest ep of It’s Been A Big Day For…below:

Speaking about the age-old stereotype that beer is a ‘man’s drink,’ Carla said, “The fact that women weren’t allowed in bars in Queensland to drink with the men until the ‘70s might have something to do with it… the industrial revolution might have something to do with it.”

“It was originally women that were brewing beer,” Daunton revealed. “It was women’s work. You make the bread – you’ve got the yeast, you’ve got the bread water, you make the beer.”

Credit: Young Henrys

During our chat with Daunton, she also spoke about taste-testing beer at 6am, where to begin if you’re a beer novice, the supportive brew crew at Young Henrys and how craft beer has become more accessible to the masses because of the changing culture of drinking

Young Henrys’ FREE THE NEIPA launches nationwide on Friday March 6th so make sure you give it a taste, get some good karma and support the sisterhood in the process. 

Always be in the loop with our snackable podcast breaking the biggest story of the day. Subscribe to It’s Been A Big Day For… on your favourite podcast app.

Badass Aussie Women We Need To Remember In 2020: Louise Mack

She was the first woman war correspondent to report from the front line during WWI.

This Sunday, the 8th of March is International Women’s Day. It’s a day celebrated all over the world when all women are recognised for their achievements – both great and small. 

While there are countless women both here, and overseas, that are at the forefront of improving gender equality and fighting against sexual discrimination and injustice, there are just as many trailblazers who have sadly passed away.

Listen to Sandra Sully talk about using your voice and all things IWD on It’s Been A Big Day For…below:

These women paved the way and smashed glass ceilings for generations to come and deserve just as much recognition this International Women’s Day.

One of those women is Louise Mack, a poet, journalist, novelist one of Australia’s most notable female war correspondents.

After writing for The Bulletin and publishing various novels and poetry collections in the late 1800s and early 1900s, Louise Mack moved to England and Italy, where she lived for many years.

In 1914, when the war broke out, Mack was in Belgium where she worked as the first female war correspondent for the Evening News and the London Daily Mail. According to her obituary, Mack disguised herself by posing as a “Belgian serving made and cut sandwiches for German soldiers in one of the restaurants in Antwerp.”

In 1915, Mack’s eyewitness account of the German invasion of Antwerp was turned into a book titled A Woman’s Experiences in the Great War. Later, she made a living by touring the country to speak about her experiences and raise funds for the Red Cross.

For The Australian Media Hall of Fame, Craig Munro wrote that “Louise – or Louie as she was known to her close acquaintances – revelled in the largely masculine world of 1980s bohemian Sydney, mixing easily with journalists, editors, impecunious poets and eccentric artists.”

In her book The Romantic Lives of Louise Mack, Mack’s niece Nancy Phelam said her aunt “never considered herself a lesser writer just because she was a woman.” 

Listen to the GOAT team breakdown Miley Cyrus’ new tattoo and it’s deeper meaning for women on It’s Been A Big Day For…below:

Louise Mack died in Mosman, NSW in 1935, but her fearlessness in the face of conflict and her ability to adapt to so many different circumstances cements her status as one of the great Australian women in media. 

Always be in the loop with our snackable podcast breaking the biggest story of the day. Subscribe to It’s Been A Big Day For… on your favourite podcast app.

Badass Aussie Women We Need To Remember In 2020: Margaret Whitlam

"Always by Gough's side; never in his shadow."

This Sunday, the 8th of March is International Women’s Day. It’s a day celebrated all over the world when all women are recognised for their achievements – both great and small. 

While there are countless women both here, and overseas, that are at the forefront of improving gender equality and fighting against sexual discrimination and injustice, there are just as many trailblazers who have sadly passed away.

These women paved the way and smashed glass ceilings for generations to come and deserve just as much recognition this International Women’s Day.

Listen to us talk the importance of using your voice and everything IWD with Sandra Sully on It’s Been A Big Day For…

Anyone with a basic understanding of Australian will be familiar with former Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam. However, not everyone will be aware of Margaret Whitlam – a social campaigner, published author and the wife of Gough.

According to her obituary, Margaret Whitlam “was always by Gough’s side; she was never in his shadow,” which is a true reflection of the impact she made whilst being “one half of the most extraordinary and certainly most enduring personal and political partnerships in Australian history.”

Whitlam, born Margaret Dovey, excelled at sport at a young age and towering over her peers at 6 foot 2, ended up representing Australia in the 220-yard breaststroke at the 1938 British Empire Games. After graduating from the University of Sydney with a Diploma of Social studies, Margaret began working at Parramatta District Hospital and went on to Gough Whitlam in 1942.

In her obituary, Whitlam is described as a “fiercely loyal and devoted wife and mother,” but that didn’t mean she took a backseat when it came to her public role. Not only did she work in her husband’s electorate, but she was an active member of the Labor Party Women’s Conference.

“It annoyed Margaret – and would continue to annoy her throughout her life – when people assumed her political views and commitment were a reflection of those of her husband,” her obituary states. In a 1972 diary entry, she reportedly wrote, “What am I to do? Stay in a cage – wide open to view, of course – and say nothing? That’s not on, but if I can do some good I’ll certainly try.”

This sentiment proved true over the course of Margaret Whitlam’s public life as she remained outspoken on women’s rights including abortion law reform, and wrote a column for Woman’s Day, offering insight into life as a Prime Minister’s wife. According to ABC News, she was “outspoken about the dismissal of the Whitlam government in 1975, saying she told Mr Whitlam he should have torn up the letter from then governor general John Kerr.”

In 1983, Margaret Whitlam was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia for services to the community, and in 1997, she became one of the one hundred Australian National Living Treasures. 

Whitlam passed away in hospital in March 2012 after suffering a fall. Gough Whitlam, to whom she was married for almost 70 years, said, “she was a remarkable person and love of my life.” 

Credit: AAP Image/POOL IMAGE, Brad Hunter

Margaret Whitlam joins the ranks of inspiring First Ladies including Michelle Obama and Hilary Clinton. For that, and all her other achievements, she deserves to be not only remembered but celebrated.

Always be in the loop with our snackable podcast breaking the biggest story of the day. Subscribe to It’s Been A Big Day For… on your favourite podcast app.

Pop-up Channel

Follow Us